In the media

Karijini NP in the Pilbara
Ancient Pilbara rocks speak of Earth's first continents

Just add (mantle) water: new research cracks the mystery of how the first continents formed

April 2021


Yarrabubba crater
The discovery of the world’s oldest asteroid strike was a top read paper in 2020

Discovery of oldest recognised impact structure one of the most read articles of 2020

March 2021

A research paper from Curtin’s Yarrabubba asteroid discovery team was one of the most read Nature Communications articles in Earth, environmental and planetary sciences in 2020. The paper, Precise radiometric age establishes Yarrabubba, Western Australia, as Earth’s oldest recognised meteorite impact structure, made the Top 50 Read Articles of 2020.


A melt water stream carrying ancient zircon crystals
Curtin University researchers have used ancient crystals from eroded rocks found in stream sediments in Greenland to successfully test the theory that portions of Earth's ancient crust acted as 'seeds' from which later generations of crust grew.

Earth’s outer shell ballooned during massive growth spurt 3 billion years ago

January 2021


Stirred, not shaken
Kristoffer Szilas holds the piece of rock, which he calls "the smoking gun". Here is seen the bright granitic vein that the original scientists claimed was formed as a result of a meteor impact. An international research team has now shown that these veins are 40 million years too young to fit with a meteor impact.

The world’s oldest meteor crater is not located in Maniitsoq

January 2021


Magma conveyer belt
A subterranean 'conveyor belt' of magma, pushing up to Earth's surface for millions of years, was responsible for the longest stretch of erupting supervolcanoes ever seen on the planet, according to new research.

Magma ‘conveyor belt’ fuelled world’s longest erupting supervolcanoes

November 2020


Pacific Ocean
New Curtin University-led research has uncovered how rocks sourced from the Earth's mantle are linked to the formation and breakup of supercontinents and super oceans over the past 700 million years, suggesting that the Earth is made up of two distinct "faces."

Uncovering the two faces of Earth

June 2020


Nuuk
Researchers examined some of the oldest rocks in western Greenland to probe the beginnings of today’s continents.

Greenland’s deep secret of continent formation and structure

February 2020


Yarrabubba crater
We found the world’s oldest asteroid strike in Western Australia. It might have triggered a global thaw.

Yarrabubba crater in WA outback world’s oldest recognised impact structure


Mineral sands
A chance find on Western Australia's south coast has helped trace Australia's connection to Antarctica back hundreds of millions of years.

Mineral sands’ 500-million-year journey from Antarctica to Western Australia unearthed

November 2019


Snowball Earth
Curtin University researchers have discovered that a global ice age more than 600 million years ago dramatically altered the face of the planet, leaving a barren, flooded landscape and clear oceans.

600M-year-old ice age caused ‘Snowball Earth,’ radically changing planet’s climate

October 2019


Volcano
Curtin University researchers have discovered that a global ice age more than 600 million years ago dramatically altered the face of the planet, leaving a barren, flooded landscape and clear oceans.

Giant ancient supervolcanoes threw rock right across Australia

August 2016