Micro-computed tomography laboratory

The Micro-computed tomograph forms part of the National Geosequestration Laboratory (NGL), a research and development facility established to develop innovative solutions to minimise risk and uncertainty associated with the geological storage of carbon dioxide. The facility is a collaboration between Curtin, CSIRO and UWA, and build on the successes of the Western Australian Energy Research Alliance (WA:ERA). The NGL is funded by the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education, to the value of $48.4 million.

With the micro-computed tomograph we can acquire 3D relative radiodensity maps of core plugs and fluids contained in the rock. These images have a high 3D resolution (up to (700)3). At such a high resolution the pore morphology of sandstones and carbonates can be imaged and the distribution and behaviour of multiple fluids in the rock can be observed and quantified. Please refer to our publication lists for more details or contact us.

Animations 
Animation 1A scroll through a dry Berea sandstone at a nominal resolution of (1.2µm)3. The imaged volume has a length of 3.5 mm and a 3.4 mm diameter.
Animation 2A scroll through a dry Edwards limestone at a nominal resolution of (3.4µm)3. The imaged volume has a length of 3.5 mm and a 3.4 mm diameter.
Animation 3A scroll through the dry Edwards limestone sandstone at a nominal resolution of (0.76µm)3. The imaged volume has a length of 1.2 mm and a 760 µm diameter.
Animation 4A scroll through a dry Fonteinbleau sandstone at a nominal resolution of (3.0µm)3.
Animation 5A scroll through a Clashach sandstone which contains nitrogen gas (black), brine (dark grey), and oil (white) at a nominal resolution of (1.2µm)3. The imaged volume has a length of 1.5 mm and a 1.2 mm diameter.

Slice 1: raw image slice: residual supercritical CO2 in a Doddington sandstone at reservoir conditions, evidence for the residual trapping mechanism in CGS projects (Iglauer et al. 2011). The area displayed is approximately 102. scCO2 is black, brine is light grey, and sandstone is dark grey.

Slice 2: after image processing and segmentation: residual supercritical CO2 in a Doddington sandstone at reservoir conditions, evidence for the residual trapping mechanism in CGS projects (Iglauer et al. 2011). The area displayed is approximately 102. scCO2 is white, brine is blue, and sandstone is grey.